Magnificent Mayo – Both Eggy and Vegan Versions

I don’t know if mayonnaise is in short supply just now, but making your own is pretty simple and satisfying. I do hear people are buying up eggs, so if you have some yolks spare, you can make them into mayonnaise. For vegans or those who prefer egg-free mayo, and you have a can of chickpeas handy, save a few chickpeas and the liquid (now known as Aquafaba) to make yours.

Both versions are delicious, fast and easy. You can dress up your mayo by adding fresh herbs, chives, miso, lemon, grainy mustard…. Sky’s the limit!

Mayonnaise (with eggs)

This recipe comes via the tireless testers at Cooks Illustrated and allows you to pasteurize the yolks. It should take you about 5 minutes to make, if you have all your ingredients assembled, and makes about 1.5 cups of mayo.

Ingredients:
3 tbsp water
2 large egg yolks
4 tsp lemon juice
1-1/2 cups vegetable oil, divided
3/4 tsp table salt
1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 tsp sugar

Method:

  1. Gently stir water, egg yolks, and lemon juice in bowl until no streaks of yolk remain. Microwave, stirring gently every 10 seconds, until mixture thickens slightly and registers 160-165 degrees, 1 to 2 minutes.
  2. Remove bowl from microwave and immediately add 1/4 cup oil, salt, mustard, and sugar; whisk to combine. (Tiny droplets of oil will float to top of mixture.)
  3. Strain mixture through fine-mesh strainer into bowl of food processor or blender. With processor running, slowly drizzle in remaining 1-1/4 cups oil in thin stream, about 2 minutes. Scrape bottom and sides of bowl and process 5 seconds longer. Transfer to airtight contain and refrigerate for up to 1 month.

Tips:

  • Although I prefer using extra-virgin olive oil for most things, you’ll get better results from using a refined or less flavourful oil here. I use avocado oil.
  • I have a small Vitamix blender which I use for making mayo, though it’s a bit harder to clean than a food processor. Because it’s so powerful I don’t strain the above before blending.
  • I sometimes use a hand blender too, though you may want to enlist a sous-chef to hold the container still while you drizzle in the oil.

Vegan Mayonnaise with Chickpeas and Aquafaba

Source: Serious Eats
Makes about 1 cup

Ingredients:

2 medium cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp (15ml) juice from 1 lemon
2 tsp (10ml) Dijon mustard
3 tbsp (45ml) liquid from 1 can of chickpeas, plus 12 whole chickpeas
1/2 cup (120ml) vegetable oil
1/4 cup (60ml) extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method:

  1. Combine garlic, lemon juice, mustard, chickpea liquid, and chickpeas in a tall container just large enough to fit the head of an immersion blender. Blend at high speed until completely smooth.
  2. Alternatively, blend in the jar of a standard countertop blender. With the blender running, slowly drizzle in vegetable oil. A smooth, creamy emulsion should form.
  3. Using a rubber spatula, transfer to a bowl. Whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  4. Mayonnaise will keep in a covered container in the fridge for up to 1 week.

Tips:

  • As above, although I prefer using extra-virgin olive oil for most things, you’ll get better results from using a refined or less flavourful oil here. I use avocado oil.

Making from scratch – Baked Beans (vegan)

It’s been a couple of years since I’ve had the leisure to sit down and post. Now in the time of coronavirus/COVID-19 I have time and tips to share.

I’ve followed a rule for some years: If I can make it, I don’t buy it (I’m also fond of Michael Pollan’s aphorism: you can eat anything you want — as long as you make it yourself!) I find cooking calms my busy mind, so I’m doing more of that these days, and I’ll share some staple recipes with you over the next while.

Every home should have a supply of dried beans which are so versatile and rich in fibre. And they look pretty in jars on the shelf! In all the panic buying, one food I’ve heard has disappeared from the shelves is baked beans. These are so easy to make! And commercial varieties are often shockingly high in sugar, so why not try your hand at making your own? Here you go:

Baked Beans in Tomato Sauce

Ingredients:

1 pound/500g dry navy, cannellini, borlotti or Great Northern beans (or your preference!)
1 tbsp olive oil or bacon fat
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1-1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp black pepper
1/2 tsp kelp powder
1 tbsp mustard powder
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
2 tbsp soya sauce
1/4 cup blackstrap molasses
2 cups vegetable or bone broth
1/4 cup tomato paste
2 cups crushed tomatoes, passata and/or tomato sauce
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar

Method:

  1. Pick over the beans and soak overnight.
  2. Drain and cook in fresh water to cover until just tender.
  3. Heat the oil or bacon fat and cook the onions and garlic over a low heat until soft and starting to brown.
  4. Add seasonings, molasses, broth, tomato paste and tomatoes. Heat to blend. Add beans.
  5. Cover the pot and cook in 325f/160c oven for an hour and fifteen minutes, or simmer in a crockpot until thick and flavourful.
  6. If the sauce is still thin, remove the cover and cook for 15 minutes more or until it’s the right thickness. (Note: If you plan to can, you’ll need the sauce to be more runny: see below)
  7. When the beans are tender and the sauce is thickened, remove from the heat. Stir in the apple cider vinegar, and add salt and pepper just before serving.

Tips:

  • You can use home canned beans if you have them: advice on doing this here.
  • Omnivores can bump the pork & beans flavour by using bacon fat instead of oil, or adding a bacon-browning step at the start.
  • You can fine-tune the flavour after cooking by adding (a smidge at a time!) smoked paprika, liquid smoke, chipotle sauce, or a dash of Marmite or Vegemite.
  • You can substitute or augment the sweetness with stevia or other sweeteners, but remember that blackstrap molasses adds minerals (selenium, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, copper and manganese) as well as flavour, so you’ll need to tweak to get the flavour right.
  • Baking molasses and treacle are not the same as blackstrap molasses; check labels when buying.
  • If using commercial broth, tomato sauce, tomatoes or tomato paste, check the label to check amounts of salt and/or sugar added: these will affect the nutrition content (below).

Storage:

  • Cool and refrigerate for about a week.
  • Freezing: ladle into sterilized jars and freeze for up to six months (after which flavour & texture will be less wonderful).
  • If you have a pressure canner you can store for up to a year (here’s a canning recipe from Bernardin) (not suitable for water bath canning).
  • Note: the cooking time will depend on several things, the most important being how thoroughly the beans were cooked to begin with when they were simmered. If the beans are still a bit undercooked when they go in the oven, it may take several hours to soften them.
  • Beans can become irretrievably hard through poor storage, old age or fluctuations in storage temperature. If they don’t soften after soaking and pre-cooking, you may need to start again.

Nutrition facts below are for vegan version: assume use of navy beans, olive oil, vegetable broth and canned tomatoes.